Divorce Science Research Update 6-5-2015


The most recent issue of the  Journal of Divorce and Remarriage  focus on divorce education, young adult adjustment, stepfamily adjustment and divorce in Portugal. This is Volume 56, Issue 4, 2015.

Portugal fairly recently (2008) enacted a “no-fault” divorce law.  Divorce rates in Portugal have been trending slightly upward over the past decade. (See graph.)

A more complete list of research report about divorce, remarriage and stepfamilies published in 2015 or between 2010-2015.

Divorce in Portugal 

Pereira, M. G., & Pinto, H. (2015). Women’s Perception of Separation/Divorce in Portugal: A Sociodemographic Profile. Journal of Divorce & Remarriage, 56(4), 300-316. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10502556.2015.1025896

Divorce Education (more resources for Divorce Education…)

Becher, E. H., Cronin, S., McCann, E., Olson, K. A., Powell, S., & Marczak, M. S. (2015). Parents Forever: Evaluation of an Online Divorce Education Program. Journal of Divorce & Remarriage, 56(4), 261-276. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10502556.2015.1025900

Young Adult Adjustment to Their Parents’ Divorce

Connel, B., Hayes, D., & Carlson, M. (2015). Relation Between Parental Divorce and Adjustment in College Students. Journal of Divorce & Remarriage, 56(4), 336-345. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10502556.2015.1025756

Konstam, V., Curran, T., & Karwin, S. (2015). Divorce and Emerging Adult and Young Women: Building Foundations for Self-Development. Journal of Divorce & Remarriage, 56(4), 277-299. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10502556.2015.1025897

Stepfamilies

Zeleznikow, L., & Zeleznikow, J. (2015). Supporting Blended Families to Remain Intact: A Case Study. Journal of Divorce & Remarriage, 56(4), 317-335. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10502556.2015.1025845

 

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Family Court Review– Jan 2015 Table of Contents


  1. Editorial Note

    1. You have free access to this content
      January 2015 (pages 1–5)Andrew I. Schepard and Robert E. Emery

      Article first published online: 16 JAN 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/fcre.12125

      1. Abstract
      2. Full Article (HTML)
      3. Enhanced Article (HTML)
      4. PDF(35K)

Perspectives

    1. You have free access to this content
  1. Special Feature: Reigniting the Relocation Debate

    1. Patrick Parkinson and Judy Cashmore

      Article first published online: 16 JAN 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/fcre.12128

       

    2. Presumptions, Burdens, and Best Interests in Relocation Law (pages 40–55)Rollie Thompson

      Article first published online: 16 JAN 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/fcre.12129

       

    3. Patrick Parkinson and Judy Cashmore

      Article first published online: 16 JAN 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/fcre.12130

       

  2. Additional Articles

    1. Stephanie R. deLusé and Sanford L. Braver

      Article first published online: 16 JAN 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/fcre.12131

       

    2. Jill Howieson and Lynn Priddis

      Article first published online: 16 JAN 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/fcre.12132

       

       

    3. Benjamin D. Garber

      Article first published online: 16 JAN 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/fcre.12133

       

    4. Fernanda S. Rossi, Amy Holtzworth-Munroe and Amy G. Applegate

      Article first published online: 16 JAN 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/fcre.12135

  3. The Bookshelf

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  4. Student Notes

    1. You have free access to this content
    2. Jennifer Nadraus

      Article first published online: 16 JAN 2015 | DOI: 10.1111/fcre.12138

Teens and Divorce– various resources


We have begun collecting information and programs to support teens dealing with their parents divorce.  Here are some examples:

Online Programs

Family Change:  Teen Guide to Separation and Divorce– Designed by the California Courts

Children of Divorce– Coping with Divorce (this program has a fee)

Support Groups

I Am a Child of Divorce

Also, we have begun to collect some of the recent scientific literature on teens’ perspective on their parents’  divorce.  

Hartman, L.R., Magalhaes, L., and Mandic, A. “What does parental divorce or marital separation mean for adolescents? A scoping review of north American literature” (2011). Journal of Divorce & Remarriage, 52, 490-518. doi:  http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10502556.2011.609432

Deborah Gatins , C. Ryan Kinlaw & Linda L. Dunlap (2013) Do the Kids Think
They’re Okay? Adolescents’ Views on the Impact of Marriage and Divorce, Journal of Divorce & Remarriage, 54:4, 313-328, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10502556.2013.780496

Coparenting Children with Disabilities by Jeremy Kanter


Although divorce rates are high among parents of children with disabilities (e.g., Hartley, Barker, Seltzer, Greenberg,  Bolt, Floyd, & Orsmond, 2010) coparenting education classes are just beginning to develop tracks, components, or programs for separating or divorcing parents who have children with disabilities. At the Association of Family and Conciliation Courts (AFCC) annual conference last month, the fact that coparenting education classes have neglected to attend to special circumstances linked to coparenting a child with a disability was discussed in a few of the sessions I attended.  I followed up with a few coparenting education classes when I returned from the conference and was energized to learn that some of the online programs are beginning to address this issue!

Michelle Muncy of Online Parenting Programs is one example of an online program that is planning to develop an online coparenting education program for parents who are coparenting children with disabilities. Focus on Kids, an online coparenting education class developed by Dr. David Schramm and colleagues at The University of Missouri is another example. Focus on Kids now offers fact sheets for families with special circumstances. The fact sheets that Dr. Schramm and colleagues have created for divorcing parents who have children with disabilities cover a range of topics that are especially relevant to this special circumstance; some of the topics include:

 

  • Custodial rights or what to expect as a primary caregiver of a child with a disability
  • How to divide medical costs for children with disabilities
  • The children’s cognitive capacity to understand their parents’ divorce
  • Special issues that need to be documented in parenting plans
  • Issues specific to children who have life-threatening, chronic, psychological & behavioral disabilities

With the high divorce rates for parents of children with disabilities, some of these issues in the Focus on Kids’ fact sheets are crucial components to coparenting education. Although many parents experience similar challenges when going through the separation or divorce process, it is important for programs to address the unique needs and challenges linked to families with special circumstances. Special circumstances are not limited to children with disabilities; coparenting when intimate partner violence, alcoholism, or military duties influence parents’ roles also provide unique challenges in the separation processes. In some situations, one parent may be largely absent from the child’s life, and these families may benefit from additional support in educational settings (online or face-to-face). Although the transition to tailoring information to families with special circumstances has been slow, it is promising to see that programs have begun to address these issues!

National Center for State Courts


This website catalogs resources for professionals who conduct divorce education, mediation, and other types of work with divorcing families.